Celebrate the Hubble Space Telescope’s 25 years in space – #Hubble25

23 Apr

The Hubble Space Telescope was launched on April 24, 1990 – a quarter century ago! Since then (admittedly with a couple hiccups) it has been peering deeper into the cosmos than any telescope in human history. We have learned more about the origin of the universe, the makeup of galaxies, and distant worlds though Hubble’s eye – and with great effort from many researchers around the world.

Hubble is a joint project of NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). Hubble weighs in at 11,000 kg, is 13.2 m by 4.2 m, and has a 2.4 m diameter primary mirror. Hubble coasts along in orbit at a cool 25,600 km/h at an altitude of 555 km above the surface of the Earth.

Hubble’s direct successor in space will be the James Webb Space Telescope, set for launch in 2018 – though Hubble is still expected to be in operation. Numerous next generation ground-based telescopes will also come online between 2020-2025, including the Thirty Meter Telescope (read in detail about TMT here).

To celebrate Hubble’s 25th birthday, the Hubble team released a new image from Hubble today: an image of the cluster Westerlund 2 and its surroundings.

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the cluster Westerlund 2 and its surroundings has been released to celebrate Hubble’s 25th year in orbit and a quarter of a century of new discoveries, stunning images and outstanding science. The image’s central region, containing the star cluster, blends visible-light data taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys and near-infrared exposures taken by the Wide Field Camera 3. The surrounding region is composed of visible-light observations taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys. (Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), A. Nota (ESA/STScI), and the Westerlund 2 Science Team)

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the cluster Westerlund 2 and its surroundings has been released to celebrate Hubble’s 25th year in orbit and a quarter of a century of new discoveries, stunning images and outstanding science. The image’s central region, containing the star cluster, blends visible-light data taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys and near-infrared exposures taken by the Wide Field Camera 3. The surrounding region is composed of visible-light observations taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys. (Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), A. Nota (ESA/STScI), and the Westerlund 2 Science Team)

Even after 25 years, Hubble continues to impress with its images and scientific discovery to this day. For instance, Hubble data recently contributed to strengthening the hypothesis that Jupiter’s largest moon Ganymede has a massive subsurface ocean of liquid water.

One of the best videos I’ve been able to find that offers an overview of the Hubble mission is from the telescope’s 15th birthday, back on April 24, 2005. It’s worth a watch, and of course add another decade (!!) worth of discovery on top:

On top of several physical celebrations going on around the world for the occasion of #Hubble25, there is also a lot of great content on social media:



And remember a couple years ago when the Defense Department donated two better-than-Hubble space telescopes to NASA? Read here for that one.

It’s a big universe and we need all the eyes we can get to help unravel its mysteries.

The Canadarm on board The Space Shuttle Discovery releases Hubble in April 1990. (Credit: NASA/ESA)

The Canadarm on board The Space Shuttle Discovery releases Hubble in April 1990. (Credit: NASA/ESA)

And a fun (patriotic Canadian) fact: the last piece of hardware to come into physical contact with Hubble was the Canadarm on board the Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-125 in May 2009, following the conclusion of Hubble Servicing Mission 4, the last mission to visit the telescope:

Canadarm lifts the Hubble Space Telescope out of the payload bay of Atlantis, moments before it is released into space following the successful repair mission of STS-125. (Credit: NASA)

Canadarm lifts the Hubble Space Telescope out of the payload bay of Atlantis, moments before it is released into space following the successful repair mission of STS-125. (Credit: NASA)

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